Inhofe Statement on AHS Glyphosate Study

U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) released the following statement after the National Institute of Health finally published the Agricultural Health Study on the herbicide glyphosate in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. This study is widely considered to be the preeminent study on glyphosate exposure in humans and determined that glyphosate was not a carcinogen. 

“The Agricultural Health Study confirms what we already knew—there is no link between glyphosate exposure and cancer. This only echoes the findings of the EPA’s Scientific Advisory Panel and the European Chemicals Agency, both of which have also determined that glyphosate is not a carcinogen. These findings reaffirm my concern that the previous administration purposefully withheld the release of this report while they refused to finish glyphosate’s registration review.

“I hope that with this report being made public, and with the new leadership at the EPA, glyphosate’s long overdue registration review will be completed.”

Background:

  • In August, Sen. Inhofe sent a letter to Secretary Tom Price and Director Collins requesting the release of the Agricultural Health Study.
  • In April 2016, EPA published and quickly removed a Final Report from the cancer assessment committee (CARC) that concluded glyphosate is “not likely to be carcinogenic to humans.”
  • July 12, 2016, Senator Inhofe, as chairman of the EPW committee, sent a letter to Deputy Assistant Administrator and Science Advisor in EPA’s Office of Research and Development Dr. Thomas Burke to express his concern with the delay in EPA’s registration review of glyphosate despite its own scientists’ findings that it is safe.
  • On July 26, 2016, EPA published a notice in the Federal Register that it would be convening a science advisory panel (SAP) to review whether glyphosate causes cancer in humans.
  • On Sept. 12, 2016, EPA re-released the CARC report along with the Glyphosate Issue Paper: Evaluation of Carcinogenic Potential, which “proposed that glyphosate is not likely to be a carcinogenic to humans at doses relevant for human health risk assessment.”
  • Dec. 13–16, 2016, the SAP on glyphosate met to review the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate.
  • March 10, Senator Inhofe sent a letter to EPA Administrator Pruitt check on the status of glyphosate’s registration review.