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Oklahoma Community Projects Funding

Project Name: Tulsa and West Tulsa Levee System 

Cost: $13,789,200
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
Location: City of Tulsa and Tulsa County
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
Support: "As we saw during historic flooding a couple of years ago, Tulsa must have dependable levees for residents' protection and safety," Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum said. "I want to thank Senator Inhofe for his leadership in pursuing funding for improvements to Tulsa's levee system."
 
"I am so grateful to Senator Inhofe's work to secure funding supporting the Tulsa West-Tulsa Levee project," Tulsa County Commissioner Karen Keith said. "Without his efforts throughout the years, we would not be optimistic about the future of the levees. If approved, this congressional directed spending would go a long way in modernizing the levees."
 
"We have worked closely throughout the years with Sen. Inhofe to make the Tulsa and West-Tulsa Levee project a reality," District 12 Levee Commissioner Todd Kilpatrick said. "We are incredibly grateful to have such a force working on our behalf to ensure the levees are safe and reliable for the people of Tulsa and the surrounding communities - this funding will only help in these efforts."
 
This project would continue and expedite design work on the first phase of the Tulsa and West Tulsa Levee System (TWTLS) project.
 
In 2019, Oklahoma suffered a devastating flood event that made clear how important it is to modernize the TWTLS. Floodwaters along the levee system remained high for 11 days, putting incredible strain on the aging levee system. Any catastrophic failure would have resulted in the inundation of the homes and businesses of thousands of Oklahomans. In April 2020, Corps completed a feasibility study related to the modernization and upgrade of the TWTLS and Congress authorized the project in WRDA 2020. This project will protect large elderly and low-income vulnerable populations and two refineries critical to the Tulsa economy from future flooding disasters.
 

Project Name: Arkansas River Navigation Study

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
Location: 445 miles of the Arkansas River from the Mississippi River to the Tulsa Ports of Catoosa (15 miles east of Tulsa, Oklahoma)
State: Oklahoma and Arkansas
Certification: Link here
 
This project would continue and expedite design work on the first phase of the MKARNS 12 ft. channel deepening project. 
 
The MKARNS serves a 12-state region originating at the Port of Catoosa in northeast Oklahoma and running southeast through Oklahoma and Arkansas before meeting the Mississippi River. The Tulsa Ports of Catoosa and Inola are the most westerly inland river ports that are ice-free year round providing a continuous ability for farmers and manufacturers to ship their freight in the most cost effective way. The MKARNS moves 11 million tons of commerce worth $4 billion annually. The MKARNS is a vital corridor for agriculture commerce (soybeans and wheat) and aggregate commodities (sand, gravel, and rock) from the Gulf Coast to the Mid-West. The MKARNS, on an annual basis, provides for $8.5 billion in sales impacts, $1.6 billion in transportation cost savings, and $289 million in business taxes. In 2015, the Corps upgraded the classification of the MKARNS from "Connector" to "Corridor" on the National Marine Highway, designated the MKARNS as a high-use waterway system, and labeled the MKARNS as Marine Highway 40. While approximately 90 percent of the MKARNS is already 12 ft. deep, completing this deepening would increase the capacity of each barge by over 40 percent and resulting in over $250 million in increased business sales annually.
 

Project Name: Operations and Maintenance of the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS)

Cost: $43,000,000
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
Location: Arkansas River between Broken Arrow and Fort Coffee
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would continue and accelerate critical maintenance work on locks and dams along the MKARNS.
 
The MKARNS serves a 12-state region originating at the Port of Catoosa in northeast Oklahoma and running southeast through Oklahoma and Arkansas before meeting the Mississippi River. The MKARNS moves 11 million tons of commerce worth $4 billion annually. MKARNS is a vital corridor for agriculture commerce (soybeans and wheat) and aggregate commodities (sand, gravel, and rock) from the Gulf Coast to the Mid-West. The MKARNS, on an annual basis, provides for $8.5 billion in sales impacts, $1.6 billion in transportation cost savings, and $289 million in business taxes. In 2015, the Corps upgraded the classification of the MKARNS from "Connector" to "Corridor" on the National Marine Highway, designated the MKARNS as a high-use waterway system, and labeled the MKARNS as Marine Highway 40. This request would provide $43 million above the FY2022 President's Budget Request for the MKARNS, Oklahoma project in the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) account, and includes seven work packages for critical backlog maintenance work within the Tulsa District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: Rehabilitate and Paint Tainter Gates at Robert S. Kerr L&D for $9 million; Rehabilitate and Paint Tainter Gates at Webbers Falls L&D for $9 million; Rehabilitate Tainter Valves at Newt Graham L&D for $2.5 million; Rehabilitate and Paint Tainter Gates at Newt Graham L&D for $7 million; Rehabilitate Tainter Valves at WD Mayo L&D for $2.5 million; Rehabilitate and Paint Tainter Gates at WD Mayo L&D for $9 million; and Repair Exposed Structural Rebar on Spillway Bridge at Robert S. Kerr L&D for $4 million.
 

Project Name: Construction of the Arkansas River Navigation Study

Cost: $10,000,000
Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
Location: 445 miles of the Arkansas River from the Mississippi River to the Tulsa Ports of Catoosa (15 miles east of Tulsa, Oklahoma) 
State: Oklahoma and Arkansas
Certification: Link here
 
This project would complete design work and initiate construction on the first phase of the MKARNS 12 ft. channel deepening project.
 
The MKARNS serves a 12-state region originating at the Port of Catoosa in northeast Oklahoma and running southeast through Oklahoma and Arkansas before meeting the Mississippi River. The Tulsa Ports of Catoosa and Inola are the most westerly inland river ports that are ice-free year round providing a continuous ability for farmers and manufacturers to ship their freight in the most cost effective way. The MKARNS moves 11 million tons of commerce worth $4 billion annually. The MKARNS is a vital corridor for agriculture commerce (soybeans and wheat) and aggregate commodities (sand, gravel, and rock) from the Gulf Coast to the Mid-West. The MKARNS, on an annual basis, provides for $8.5 million in sales impacts, $1.6 billion in transportation cost savings, and $289 million in business taxes. In 2015, the Corps upgraded the classification of the MKARNS from "Connector" to "Corridor" on the National Marine Highway, designated the MKARNS as a high-use waterway system, and labeled the MKARNS as Marine Highway 40. While approximately 90 percent of the MKARNS is already 12 ft. deep, completing this deepening would increase the capacity of each barge by over 40 percent and resulting in over $250 million in increased business sales annually.
 
Praise for Sen. Inhofe's work on the MKARNS:
 
"Senator Inhofe has always been a staunch advocate for the McClellan Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS)," Port Director of the Port of Muskogee Kimbra Scott said. "His tireless efforts to secure funding for the much needed backlog of critical maintenance and design and construction funding for the 12' deepening of the MKARNS demonstrates his commitment to river-based industries. Thank you Senator Inhofe for your leadership and commitment to the State of Oklahoma."
 
"The Tulsa Port of Catoosa is one of the nation's premier inland river port industrial parks and transportation facilities and typically moves about 2 million tons of waterborne freight annually in and out of Oklahoma," Port Director of the Tulsa Port of Catoosa David Yarbrough said. "The reliability and efficiency of the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS) is essential to our business, and the State's and nation's economy.  We are grateful to Senator Jim Inhofe for his support of, and advocacy for the needs of the system, including ongoing maintenance of system infrastructure, such as locks and dams, and advancing the design and funding for a deeper navigation channel, which would increase barge-carrying-capacity by as much as 40 percent.  Senator Inhofe's efforts to enhance the MKARNS will make the most fuel-efficient, form of freight transportation even more resilient."
 

Project Name: W.C. Austin Project - "Lugert-Altus Irrigation District Modernization"

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Location: The W.C. Austin Project (Project) features include Altus Dam; the Main, Altus, West, and Ozark Canals; a 218-mile lateral distribution system; and 26 miles of drains. 
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
Support: "Sen. Inhofe has always been a leader focused on improving Oklahoma' water infrastructure, and I am grateful to see him continue these efforts with this funding request," said General Manager of the Lugert-Altus Irrigation District Tom Buchanan. "This congressionally directed funding would help upgrade the Lugert-Altus Irrigation District's annual irrigation efforts, bringing tremendous economic growth to the region as we continue to serve the needs of our community."
 
This project would allow for district irrigation modernization to address Lugert-Altus Irrigation District water supply shortages, through improving water infrastructure and management, in support of the environment and agricultural industry.
 
The primary storage unit is Lake Altus, a reservoir formed by a dam across the North Fork of the Red River about 18 miles north of Altus, and by several earth dikes at low places in the reservoir rim. The Main Canal transports water from Lake Altus to the northern boundary of the project's irrigable land. The project was authorized by the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1938. The Lugert-Altus Irrigation District, the Oklahoma Department of Tourism, and the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation manage the project.
 
As the project manager, the Lugert-Altus Irrigation District delivers water to 48,000 acres of cotton crops. The irrigated cotton producers within the district yield approximately 1250-1800 pounds of cotton per acre, creating a significant economic impact within the region. Early construction of the district was completed in the late 1940s and much of that outdated infrastructure remains today. A key priority for the cotton producers within the Irrigation District is more efficient water delivery and use. The Irrigation District has identified approximately 17 miles of the irrigation system within the Ozark Canals that needs to be converted to pipe. While the President's FY22 budget requests $942,000 for the project's operations, maintenance and development, that funding does not provide the necessary resources to carry out this modernization request. $5 million would help fund the construction of a water pipeline within the Ozark canal section of the irrigation district. The conversion from open canal to pipe would result in significant water conservation and delivery efficiency, allowing for the implementation of better water conservation practices as well as an increase in cotton production for the region. The 2005 estimate of the total delivery system efficiency was about 65 percent. This means that of the 63,000 acre-feet released from storage by the District in an average year, only about 41,000 acre-feet are delivered to customers.
 

Project Name: Biorepository for Pandemic Preparedness

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Agriculture
Location: City of Stillwater
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
Support: "Oklahoma, as a largely rural and agricultural state, is uniquely positioned to capture the benefits of animal science insights that can improve the human, animal, and plant health of our state and nation and prepare for any future health crises," Oklahoma Secretary of Agriculture Blayne Arthur said. "Creation of a biorepository to collect and store specimens at the Oklahoma Pandemic Center for Innovation and Excellence will be critical to our efforts to address zoonotic diseases. The biorepository will enhance our understanding of all types of disease threats, including both animal and plant, and help protect our country in the future. We appreciate Senator Inhofe's vision and leadership on this issue." 
 
This funding would go toward the standing up of a biorepository for human, plant and animal specimen collection and storage to address zoonotic diseases.
 
Approaching a public health crisis - such as the COVID-19 pandemic from just the lens of human health response limits our ability to properly mitigate and address the public health needs that arise around human, animal health and food safety. The U.S. must continue its One Health response to best address our nation's needs. The One Health approach recognizes that the health of people is closely connected to the health of animals and plant life, bringing together experts through collaboration and partnerships in these sciences to improve pandemic response and public health capabilities at large.
 
The Oklahoma Pandemic Center for Innovation and Excellence (OPCIE) is uniquely positioned to help bring the U.S. closer to this goal. OCPIE is first of its kind collaborative and immersive campus established by the Oklahoma State Department of Health during the COVID-19 pandemic in partnership with the Oklahoma Governor and federal, state, and private industry leadership. OPCIE is located in the heart of the U.S., bringing cutting-edge science to the fields of human, animal and plant life health. With innovation at its core, it leverages partnerships between public and private entities to bridge the gap between laboratory and clinical practices, and creates improved public health responses incorporating the unique needs of rural, urban and tribal communities.
 
Due to Oklahoma's central location and position as a top agriculture and livestock producing state, the OPCIE has the unique opportunity to study emerging biothreats and lead the nation's fight in disease prevention and response by, for example, using the most recent molecular technology to identify new variants of diseases in animals or plants and preventing them from entering the supply chain or transmitting to humans. This innovative and collaborative approach of leveraging the intersection of animal and plant life sciences to identify and respond to threats positions the lab to be a global leader in training the nation's public health leaders.
 
$5 million for a biorepository, as provided through APHIS's Zoonotic Disease Management program and directed through the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, will play an integral role to this end by providing the OPCIE with the ability to house and study human, plant, and animal samples.
 

Project Name: Activities Support for Combating Drug Trafficking in Oklahoma

Cost: $4,000,000 
Recipient: OK Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control
Location: Oklahoma City
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
Support: "Securing this funding would provide additional resources to the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics to help stop drug trafficking and other crimes," said Director of the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics Donnie Anderson. "We are grateful for Sen. Inhofe's leadership and his continued efforts to help the people of Oklahoma."
 
This project would support activities to combat drug trafficking.
 
For several years, Oklahoma has encountered increased public safety challenges, including an increase in drug trafficking, money laundering, tax evasion, human trafficking and other crimes. These crimes put the safety of every Oklahoman in jeopardy. Criminal enterprises, including those involved in transnational criminal organizations, are known to have targeted Oklahoma in recent years.
 
The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control (OBN) is responsible for registering any entity who manufactures or distributes a controlled dangerous substance. OBN is also responsible for enforcing the state's criminal and administrative drug laws. OBN is the primary state law enforcement entity responsible with countering the activities associated with drug trafficking. A surge of additional resources is needed. As such, $4 million is needed to support the salaries, equipment, and investigative activities of twenty (20) narcotic enforcement agents, three (3) intelligence analysts, and one (1) attorney. This appropriation would provide the necessary resources to better identify, investigate, and dismantle criminal drug trafficking operations across the state. 
 

Project Name: Tulsa International Airport Air Traffic Control Tower

Cost: $20,000,000
Recipient: Tulsa Airports Improvement Trust
Location: City of Tulsa
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for construction of a new air traffic control tower at Tulsa International Airport (TUL) to provide a safe, functional and reliable facility for air traffic control services required to operate the Tulsa airspace system.
 
TUL's existing air traffic control tower was built in 1962, making it one of the oldest towers in the FAA's air traffic organization. Building modifications have been made throughout the years to accommodate changing operational needs; however, the building today does not meet present day building codes or the FAA's operational standards. The facility's maintenance needs are growing exponentially approaching $700,000 per year - and must be addressed in order to preserve the safety, security and continuity of the national air transportation system. The Tulsa Airports Improvement Trust, the owner of the TUL Air Traffic Control Tower, is committed to completing the site selection, design and construction of a new air traffic control tower at TUL. 
 
The new facility will provide the dependable infrastructure necessary for the safe operation of air traffic within TUL's approach and local control areas and will allow the TUL facility to expand their services beyond its existing capabilities. The facility will also serve as a redundant control facility for military and air traffic operations in the Oklahoma City area, should those facilities experience a catastrophic disruption in service.
 

Project Name: Tulsa International Airport Federal Inspection Service Facility

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: Tulsa Airports Improvement Trust
Location: City of Tulsa
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for construction of a new Federal Inspection Service Facility to provide screening of commercial and general aviation passenger and cargo flights arriving from international destinations.
 
Tulsa International Airport's (TUL's) existing Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) office is located near the airport terminal, adjacent to cargo warehouse facilities. The 1,272 square foot facility requires CBP officers to travel to arriving aircraft in order to conduct inspections on aircraft ramps, typically adjacent to FBOs or corporate hangars. CBP notified the Tulsa Airport Improvement Trust in 2016 that the TUL facilities were inadequate to accommodate their mission and that they would cease operations at TUL unless the airport was able to provide a new facility that meets their needs and current design standards. In 2019, Tulsa Airports Improvement Trust (TAIT) engaged an architectural and engineering firm to begin preliminary conceptual design of a new facility. In February 2020, they had selected a location adjacent to the terminal building that would provide adequate space to build a new facility that would accommodate airside access for agents and terminal access for passengers to enter upon successful clearance through the Customs inspection. The estimated cost of the fully designed Federal Inspection Service facility was $10 million and included a phased plan that would allow airport revenues to be used in its construction over a five-year period. The entire project was put on hold in March 2020 as a result of declining activity and revenues because of the COVID 19 pandemic. CBP continues to operate out of their existing facility under an annual agreement with assurances that TAIT will continue to seek funding for construction of a new facility.
 
A fully functional Federal Inspection Service facility will meet the needs of all users who receive services today and commercial air carriers that would provide connections to Tulsa from international destinations (most likely Mexico, Latin America, and the Caribbean). Construction of a Federal Inspection Service Facility will begin as soon as funding is made available. The new facility must be fully constructed and operational no later than January 2026.
 
This project is an approved capital item in the airport's long-term capital program and was approved by TUL's signatory air carriers in June 2019. The airport intends to use general airport revenues to fund this critical community service, however, the timing of funding has now been delayed as airport revenues were greatly impacted as a result of the pandemic. 
 
Praise for Sen. Inhofe's work on the TUL Federal Inspection Service Facility and Air Traffic Control Tower:
 
"Having the ability to construct a new air traffic control tower and a new Federal Inspection Service Facility at Tulsa International Airport will help us serve the citizens of the Tulsa metropolitan area and surrounding region with the highest level of care and safety," said Tulsa Airports Improvement Trust Executive Director Alexis Higgins. "We are extremely grateful to Senator Inhofe for his work towards securing these congressionally directed funds and his continued dedication to the Tulsa community."
 

Project Name: I-40/Douglas Blvd Reconstruction and Widening in Oklahoma City

Cost: $15,000,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Oklahoma City
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for the reconstruction of the I-40/Douglas Interchange, including capacity improvements to I-40 near Tinker Air Force Base.
 
This project will reconstruct and add capacity to I-40, a major freight highway and alternative fuel corridor. In addition, the project will greatly enhance access and reduce congestion for personnel at Tinker Air Force Base by reconstructing the I-40 and Douglas interchange, which serves three access points into the base. Congestion and collisions at the interchange and throughout the corridor will be reduced and capacity for additional freight will be enhanced.
 
Earlier this month, Sen. Inhofe applauded an announcement that the U.S. Department of Transportation had awarded this project with a $50 million grant through the Infrastructure for Rebuilding America (INFRA) Grant Program. This project is the Oklahoma Department of Transportation's (ODOT's) Eight-year Construction Work Plan. The INFRA grant award and this funding request, along with regular formula funds and State funds, will help ODOT accelerate and finalize construction of this critical project.
 

Project Name: SH-3 from Lane to Farris

Cost: $15,000,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Lane
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for construction of safety shoulders on 5.4 miles of a rural two-lane facility with deficient shoulders.
 
The State of Oklahoma currently has 5,299 miles of rural two-lane highways with deficient shoulders. Nearly 60 percent of fatalities and accidents with serious injury occur on rural highways in Oklahoma. These fatalities and serious injury accidents have a significant correlation to deficient shoulders and are at times a result of drivers leaving the existing pavement and overcorrecting into oncoming traffic. The project will have a direct impact and reduction of fatalities and accidents with serious injury in rural Oklahoma.
 
The project is included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan. This funding request would contribute to construction of 5.4 miles of safety shoulders on SH-3 from Lane to Farris. 
 

Project Name: US-277 between Cement and Bailey Turnpike

Cost: $10,187,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Cement
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for construction of safety shoulders on 2.7 miles of a rural two-lane facility with deficient shoulders.
 
The State of Oklahoma currently has 5,299 miles of rural two-lane highways with deficient shoulders. Nearly 60 percent of fatalities and accidents with serious injury occur on rural highways in Oklahoma. These fatalities and serious injury accidents have a significant correlation to deficient shoulders and are at times a result of drivers leaving the existing pavement and overcorrecting into oncoming traffic. The project will have a direct impact and reduction of fatalities and accidents with serious injury in rural Oklahoma.
 
The project is included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan and has a completed NEPA document. This funding request would complete construction of 2.7 miles of safety shoulders on US-277 between Cement and the HE Bailey Turnpike.
 

Project Name: SH-20 in Hominy

Cost: $8,102,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Hominy
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for construction of safety shoulders on 5 miles of a rural two-lane facility with deficient shoulders.
 
The State of Oklahoma currently has 5,299 miles of rural two-lane highways with deficient shoulders. Nearly 60 percent of fatalities and accidents with serious injury occur on rural highways in Oklahoma. These fatalities and serious injury accidents have a significant correlation to deficient shoulders and are at times a result of drivers leaving the existing pavement and overcorrecting into oncoming traffic. The project will have a direct impact and reduction of fatalities and accidents with serious injury in rural Oklahoma.
 
The project is included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan and has a completed NEPA document. This funding request would complete construction of five miles of safety shoulders on SH-20 from Hominy to the east.
 

Project Name: SH-152 in Washita County

Cost: $4,563,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: Washita County
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for construction of safety shoulders on four miles of a rural two-lane facility with deficient shoulders.
 
The State of Oklahoma currently has 5,299 miles of rural two-lane highways with deficient shoulders. Nearly 60 percent of fatalities and accidents with serious injury occur on rural highways in Oklahoma. These fatalities and serious injury accidents have a significant correlation to deficient shoulders and are at times a result of drivers leaving the existing pavement and overcorrecting into oncoming traffic. The project will have a direct impact and reduction of fatalities and accidents with serious injury in rural Oklahoma.
 
The project is included in the ODOT's  Eight-year Construction Work Plan and has a completed NEPA document. This funding request would complete construction of four miles of safety shoulders on SH-152 beginning 1.58 miles east of Beckham county line and extending east.
 

Project Name: US-283 North of the Red River in Elmer

Cost: $6,167,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Elmer
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for construction of safety shoulders on 4.25 miles of a rural two-lane facility with deficient shoulders.
 
The State of Oklahoma currently has 5,299 miles of rural two-lane highways with deficient shoulders. Nearly 60% (59.3%) of fatalities and accidents with serious injury occur on rural highways in Oklahoma. These fatalities and serious injury accidents have a significant correlation to deficient shoulders and are at times a result of drivers leaving the existing pavement and overcorrecting into oncoming traffic. The project will have a direct impact and reduction of fatalities and accidents with serious injury in rural Oklahoma.
 
The project is included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan and has a completed NEPA document. This funding request would complete construction of 4.25 miles of safety shoulders on US-283 beginning 0.5 miles north of the Red River and extending 4.25 miles.
 

Project Name: SH-136 from US-412 in Guymon

Cost: $7,892,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Guymon
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for construction of safety shoulders on 2.4 miles of a rural two-lane facility with deficient shoulders.
 
The State of Oklahoma currently has 5,299 miles of rural two-lane highways with deficient shoulders. Nearly 60 percent of fatalities and accidents with serious injury occur on rural highways in Oklahoma. These fatalities and serious injury accidents have a significant correlation to deficient shoulders and are at times a result of drivers leaving the existing pavement and overcorrecting into oncoming traffic. These projects will have a direct impact and reduction of fatalities and accidents with serious injury in rural Oklahoma.
 
The project is included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan and has a completed NEPA document. This funding request would complete construction of 2.4 miles of safety shoulders on SH-136 from US-412 south for 2.4 miles outside of Guymon, OK.
 

Project Name: US-281/SH-45 Junction in Waynoka

Cost: $8,000,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Waynoka
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for construction of safety shoulders on 3.79 miles of a rural two-lane facility with deficient shoulders.
 
The State of Oklahoma currently has 5,299 miles of rural two-lane highways with deficient shoulders. Nearly 60 percent of fatalities and accidents with serious injury occur on rural highways in Oklahoma. These fatalities and serious injury accidents have a significant correlation to deficient shoulders and are at times a result of drivers leaving the existing pavement and overcorrecting into oncoming traffic. These projects will have a direct impact and reduction of fatalities and accidents with serious injury in rural Oklahoma.
 
The project is included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan and has a completed NEPA document. This funding request would complete construction of safety shoulders on US-281 from 4.21 miles west of the US-281/SH-45 Jct. and extending east 3.79 miles near Waynoka.
 

Project Name: US-64/SH-14 Junction in Alva

Cost: $4,000,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Alva
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for preparation for construction of safety shoulders on 8.1 miles of a rural two-lane facility with deficient shoulders.
 
The State of Oklahoma currently has 5,299 miles of rural two-lane highways with deficient shoulders. Nearly 60 percent of fatalities and accidents with serious injury occur on rural highways in Oklahoma. These fatalities and serious injury accidents have a significant correlation to deficient shoulders and are at times a result of drivers leaving the existing pavement and overcorrecting into oncoming traffic. These projects will have a direct impact and reduction of fatalities and accidents with serious injury in rural Oklahoma.
 
The project is included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan and has a completed NEPA document. This funding request would complete the right of way and utilities phase of this project on US-64 beginning 3.05 miles east of the US-64/SH-14 junction and extending eight miles east in Alva.
 

Project Name: I-35 Bridges over NE 63rd Street in Oklahoma City

Cost: $15,000,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Oklahoma City
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would replace Northbound and Southbound "at risk" bridges over NE 63rd Street, replace a fracture critical bridge, and make operational improvements to the I-44/I-35 Interchange.
 
In addition, the project will include operational improvements to increase capacity and realign Interstate-to-Interstate connections to create a safer and more efficient driving experience.
 
The project is included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan and has a completed NEPA document and this funding request will contribute towards the total construction costs. 
 

Project Name: US-169 SW Ramp over I-244 in Tulsa

Cost: $10,600,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Tulsa
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would replace a fracture critical bridge.
 
This project will reconstruct a major flyover fracture critical bridge at the I-244/US-169 interchange. An emergency repair project was recently completed as a result of a vehicular impact. During the repair project, additional issues were identified leading to the need for ODOT to expedite a bridge replacement for this facility.
 
The project is included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan. This funding request would begin reconstruction of this critical bridge.
 

Project Name: I-35/SH-9W Interchange in Newcastle

Cost: $4,961,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Newcastle
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for acquisition of right-of-way and relocation of utilities to prepare for the reconstruction of a modern interchange.
 
I-35/SH9W interchange improvement project will address increasing intra- and interstate freight demands, congestion levels and upgrade the existing facility to current interstate standards. 
 
The project is included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan and the environmental document is well underway with an anticipated completion date towards the end of the calendar year. This funding request would go to right-of-way acquisition and utilities relocation costs to prepare for construction of this new interchange.
 

Project Name: US-70 Bypass in Madill

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Location: City of Madill
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would acquire right-of-ways and move utilities for the realignment of US-70 in Madill.
 
By upgrading and realigning US-70 the project will reduce travel time, improve safety and upgrade corridor conditions through downtown Madill. The project will provide better access and offers opportunities for revitalization of the existing corridor.  
 
Both the right-of-way and utility phases of the project are included in the ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan and the environmental assessment is nearing completion and a FONSI is anticipated by the end of the calendar year. The funding request would go to right-of-way acquisition and utilities relocation costs to prepare for construction of this new realignment.
 
Praise for Sen. Inhofe's work on Oklahoma's highways:
 
"We are very grateful to Sen. Inhofe for requesting federal funds to advance these priority highway projects in both rural and urban parts of the state," said Oklahoma Secretary of Transportation and Oklahoma Department of Transportation Executive Director Tim Gatz. "These critical needs have already been identified in ODOT's Eight-year Construction Work Plan, so additional funding from Congress will help us move construction forward and realize the benefits of these needed traffic safety and congestion relief projects much sooner."
 

Project Name: Fires Innovation Science and Technology Accelerator (FISTA)

Cost: $3,950,000
Recipient: FISTA Trust Development Authority
Location: City of Lawton
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
Support: "We are grateful to Senator Inhofe for his work to prioritize the Fires Innovation Science & Technology Accelerator (FISTA)," said Lawton Mayor Stan Booker. "This request builds on Lawton's investment in the FISTA Innovation Park as it continues to grow and will allow for construction of a sensitive compartmented information facility (SCIF) and conference center to support the FISTA and the City of Lawton's economic development strategy. Senator Inhofe continues to fight for the priorities of Oklahoma and the Lawton Fort Sill community and we cannot thank him enough."
 
This project would allow for campus modernization and expansion of the FISTA Innovation Park in Lawton/Fort Sill.
 
The U.S. Army Futures Command challenged its Long Range Precision Fires (LRPF) and Air and Missile Defense (AMD) Cross-Functional Teams (CFTs) based at Fort Sill, as well as their supporting communities and academic institutions, to provide technical innovation, training and higher education, and to sponsor and grow research and development entities in science and technology outside the gates of their installations. Recognizing the opportunity for economic growth, the City of Lawton responded by forming the Fires Innovation Science and Technology Accelerator (FISTA). Using its own resources, FISTA purchased Central Mall and there established the FISTA Innovation Park. Central Mall is a commercial center near downtown Lawton that is distressed due to downturns in the brick-and-mortar retail sector and thus experiences high vacancy rates including closures of major retail anchors such as Sears and Dillard's. FISTA seeks to repurpose the 600,000 square foot structure with an estimated total cost of approximately $65 million, which is located in a severely distressed census tract, Opportunity Zone (OZ) and new market tax credit (NMTC) zone.
 
FISTA's mission is to make investments (over $15 million to date) in industrial development and activities that not only support the Army's CFT needs, technology gap fillers and shortfalls, but that also promote the laying of a foundation for ongoing high-tech job creation and economic growth in the City of Lawton and surrounding areas. The FISTA Innovation Park has proven that it is attractive to existing business; since inception, twelve major companies and research universities have committed to locating all or part of their operations as well as new jobs there to support the Army's new CFTs. This campus modernization and expansion will enable the FISTA Innovation Park to become a center of technological innovation, STEM education, business incubation and workforce development for the greater region. This funding request would go to construction of a sensitive compartmented information facility (SCIF) and conference center to support FISTA and the City of Lawton's economic development. 
 

Project Name: Welch Drinking Water Improvements

Cost: $300,000
Recipient: Welch Public Works Authority
Location: City of Welch 
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would rehabilitate a drinking water well and construct an ion exchange treatment plan in Welch.
 
This project will improve public access to safe drinking water in Welch and the surrounding rural areas while avoiding future regulatory action from EPA. Welch is located in the "Tri-State Mining Area" which is home to the Tar Creek Superfund site. This project is currently on the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality's (ODEQ's) State Intended Use Plan for the Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (DWSRF) and this funding request will advance design and construction of a drinking water well and ion exchange treatment plant in Welch.
 

Project Name: Wewoka Drinking Water Improvements

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: Wewoka Public Works Authority
Location: City of Wewoka
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for construction of a new water treatment plan to assist in reduction of disinfection by-products.
 
This project will improve public access to safe drinking water in Wewoka and the surrounding rural areas while avoiding future regulatory action from EPA. This project is currently on ODEQ's State Intended Use Plan for the DWSRF and this funding request will advance construction of a fully baffled clearwell at the water treatment plant in Wewoka.
 

Project Name: Stillwater Drinking Water Project

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: Stillwater Utilities Authority
Location: City of Stillwater
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for the rehabilitation, replacement and upgrading of the raw water conveyance system and water treatment plant.
 
This project will assist Stillwater in maintaining compliance with drinking water standards. New infrastructure and replacement of aging infrastructure of the raw water conveyance system and water treatment plant is necessary to support economic development and growing drinking water demands. This project will increase the amount of safe drinking water to adequately supply Oklahoma State University, residents and the growing rural economy. This project is currently on ODEQ's State Intended Use Plan for the DWSRF and this funding request will advance construction of a drinking water treatment plant and pump station in Stillwater.
 

Project Name: Okarche Drinking Water Project

Cost: $2,000,000
Recipient: Okarche Public Works Authority
Location: City of Okarche
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for the building of a new water treatment plant for nitrate removal in Okarche.
 
This project will enhance nitrate treatment to improve public access to safe drinking water in Okarche, and it will eliminate burdensome customer costs associated with the purchase of bottled water by at-risk populations and for use in mixing of infant formula. This project is currently on ODEQ's State Intended Use Plan for the DWSRF and this funding request will advance design and construction of a drinking water treatment plant and pump station in Okarche.
 

Project Name: McAlester Drinking Water Improvements

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: McAlester Public Works Authority
Location: City of McAlester
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for the replacement of water transmission and distribution lines throughout the City of McAlester.
 
This project would replace aging infrastructure (primarily pipes) throughout McAlester to reduce the amount of water loss in the city. As a result, this project will reduce the McAlester's cost to treat the water, will make drinking water more affordable to residents, and will extend the useful life of the treatment plant. Additionally, this project also assists McAlester in replacing old waterlines. This project is currently on ODEQ's State Intended Use Plan for the DWSRF and this funding request will advance design and installation of replacement water pipes in McAlester.
 

Project Name: Edmond Drinking Water Improvements

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: Edmond Public Works Authority
Location: City of Edmond
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for the construction and drilling of new wells along transmission lines to stabilize and increase drinking water supply.
 
This project will increase the availability of raw water to continue serving existing needs in Edmond, while also supporting future economic development in the area. With an increasing population and growing number of businesses in the area, Edmond has recognized the need to develop their long-term resiliency when it comes to their drinking water system. This project is currently on ODEQ's State Intended Use Plan for the DWSRF and this funding request will advance construction of a below grade shaft, wet lake takes and intake screens, and a pump station in Edmond.
 

Project Name: Cherokee Drinking Water Project

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: Cherokee County Rural Water District #1
Location: City of Cherokee
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for the construction of treatment lines, water storage tanks, pump station and water meters in Cherokee.
 
This project would improve the existing water treatment facility and address water loss in the distribution system. Once complete, this project will allow Cherokee Co. Rural Water District #1 to suspend an ongoing boil water order and protect public health by providing safe drinking water to all customers, including a small rural school. The project will also provide increased revenue and enhance the long-term availability of safe drinking water in this underserved part of rural Oklahoma by eliminating leaks in the distribution system. This project is currently on ODEQ's State Intended Use Plan for the DWSRF and this funding request will advance installation of a water line and new water meters and construction of a pump station in Cherokee.
   
Praise for Sen. Inhofe's work on Oklahoma drinking water projects:
 
"It is wonderful to see the Senate consider funding drinking water projects that will improve public health for Oklahoma and our Tribal citizens," said Shellie Chard, Director of the Water Quality Division of the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality. "Oklahoman's should all thank Senator Inhofe for his efforts in bringing much needed funding to Oklahoma's drinking water systems, particularly rural and disadvantaged communities. Water and wastewater infrastructure is often out of sight and out of mind. It is great that Senator Inhofe has highlighted much needed drinking water infrastructure for funding at the national level. This funding can assist Oklahoma in improving public health and keeping water rates at affordable levels for at risk populations."
 

Project Name: Davis Wastewater Improvements

Cost: $1,000,000
Recipient: Davis Municipal Authority
Location: City of Davis
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for the planning and engineering work to make improvements to the wastewater treatment plant in Davis.
 
The City of Davis and Davis Municipal Authority are undertaking a project to extensively renovate or build a new wastewater treatment plant. The project is necessary to address significant environmental compliance issues that could lead to potential violations and possible fines. Planning and engineering work is necessary to keep future construction costs low to reduce the additional debt service burden on ratepayers.
This project is currently on the Oklahoma Water Resources Board's (OWRB's) State Intended Use Plan for the Clean Water State Revolving Loan Fund (CWSRF) and this funding request will advance planning and engineering work to improve the wastewater treatment plant in Davis.
 

Project Name: Stillwater Wastewater Project

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: Stillwater Utilities Authority
Location: City of Stillwater
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for the replacement of deteriorating and aging components of the City of Stillwater's sanitary sewer collection system.
 
This project would replace 6,800 linear feet of interceptor sewer line that was constructed in the early 1960s and is severely deteriorated and has previously collapsed. The South Interceptor carries approximately 65-75 percent of flow to the waste water treatment plant, serving Stillwater's population of about 50,000. Once complete, this project would prevent unpermitted sewer overflows and  costly emergency repair work. Additionally, replacement of the line will include upsizing to meet current and future demands for the city of Stillwater. This project is currently on the OWRB's State Intended Use Plan for the CWSRF and this funding request will advance construction to improve the sanitary sewer collection system in Stillwater.
 

Project Name: Oklahoma City Wastewater Project

Cost: $5,000,000
Recipient: Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust
Location: Oklahoma County
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
This project would allow for the upgrading of the North Canadian Wastewater Treatment Plant in Oklahoma City. 
 
This project will rehabilitate and upgrade the wastewater treatment processes at the North Canadian Wastewater Treatment Plant (NCWWTP), which will provide system reliability and help prevent river pollution, which in turn protects public health and the environment. The NCWWTP serves approximately 460,000 residents (or 70 percent) of the Oklahoma City region. This plant alone serves more than 10 percent of the entire state's population. The NCWWTP discharges treated wastewater into the North Canadian River, which serves other communities in Oklahoma. This project is currently on OWRB's State Intended Use Plan for the CWSRF and this funding request will advance construction to improve the wastewater treatment plant in Oklahoma City. 
 
Praise for Sen. Inhofe's work on Oklahoma wastewater projects:
 
"These congressionally directed spending requests would drastically improve wastewater improvement efforts in the Oklahoma City, Stillwater and Davis communities," said Oklahoma Water Resources Board Director Julie Cunningham. "Sen. Inhofe is well known for taking action when he sees a need and this instance is no different. On behalf of the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, thank you to Sen. Inhofe for continuing to fight for Oklahoma."

Project Name: Master of Science in Counseling Program

Cost: $670,000
Recipient: Mid-America Christian University (MACU)
Location: Oklahoma City
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
Support: “Mid-America Christian University expresses our sincere gratitude to Senator Inhofe in his efforts to combat the growing mental and behavioral health crisis in our community,” said Mid-America Christian University President John Fozard. “This Congressionally Directed Spending will address the significant and unprecedented shortage of trained and credentialed mental health counselors in Oklahoma.  Senator Inhofe’s continued leadership is critical now more than ever as we recover from mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Mid-America Christian University will use funding to strengthen its existing Master of Science in Counseling degree program.
 
According to the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, there is a mental health crisis across the state of Oklahoma ranging from lack of crisis centers to the need for mental health professionals. This crisis involves active-duty military and veterans—three times more of our military soldiers have died of suicide than the total number of casualties from the war in Afghanistan. Further, statistics indicate that Oklahoma is second nationwide in addictions and that one in six children in Oklahoma are diagnosed with an emotional or behavioral problem.

Mid-America Christian University’s Department of Psychology and Counseling began in 2007 with approximately 12 students. Today, there are over 213 students in the Masters of Counseling Psychology program, the largest in the state, and 165 students in the Master of Science in Counseling program. However, additional funding is needed in order to recruit and sustain a greater number of students in the program in order to provide much-needed services to the citizens of Oklahoma.

MACU will address Oklahoma’s tremendous need for mental health services by combining the University’s private match funds with federal investment to quickly recruit, train and hire more credentialed faculty members to ultimately increase the lack of mental health counselors throughout the state and serve local military families from Tinker Air force Base. Success of the program’s expansion will be measured by retention, graduation, and licensure of students entering the program, as monitored by MACU’s Office of assessment and Institutional Effectiveness.

Without this program, a significant burden rests on the state and federal government to provide its own resources to address this crisis. However, MACU holds an excellent track record of placing qualified counselors throughout the state to help improve mental health and transform lives. This project will be sustainable through continued and increased student enrollment in the program, payment by the counseling center’s patients, and the University’s funding resources.
 

Project Name: Center for Biomedical Data Sciences

Cost: $1,910,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Location: Oklahoma City
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
Support: “OMRF’s Center for Biomedical Data Sciences will bring innovative data analytic knowledge and support to scientists across Oklahoma working to understand and treat conditions like cancer, heart disease and stroke,” said Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Interim President Adam Cohen. “Sen. Inhofe has a long-standing commitment to securing critical research funding for Oklahoma. His decades of support for OMRF’s scientists have yielded discoveries that will change—and save—lives. This new project will provide our state with crucial scientific infrastructure to accelerate the process of developing new treatments for Oklahomans and people everywhere with life-threatening diseases.”
 
Funding will be used for the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation to establish Oklahoma’s first Center for Biomedical Data Sciences. 

The Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) was founded in 1946. Now in its 75th year, OMRF employs more than 450 staff members in 50 labs studying cancer, heart disease, autoimmune disorders and diseases of aging. OMRF’s scientists’ discoveries have yielded hundreds of patents and three life-saving drugs, as well as diagnostic and disease management tests for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis that are used in hospitals and clinics around the world. 

Looking forward, the amount and types of data generated in biomedical research are expanding at an unprecedented pace. Comprehensive data analytics involving biostatistical methods, data modeling, and visualization tools are utilized in numerous kinds of research at OMRF and across Oklahoma, from basic model organism studies to clinical investigations in patients. Nevertheless, from large-scale genomic sequencing to metabolomic and high-dimensional imaging analyses, expertise and leadership are needed to enable more effective integrated, systems-level analyses to gain biological and clinically meaningful insight from complex data. 

To meet this rapidly expanding need, OMRF is establishing Oklahoma’s first Center for Biomedical Data Sciences to house a team of highly trained data scientists who will support a diverse group of scientific projects aimed at improving understanding and treatment of conditions ranging from lupus and multiple sclerosis to strokes and ovarian cancer. The mission of the Center is to bring cutting-edge, integrated data analytic knowledge and support to the researchers at OMRF and all its research partners, including the University of Oklahoma (OU) Health Sciences Center, OU-Norman, the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, and Oklahoma State University. This core scientific research facility will serve as a hub for data analytics experts and as a resource to train Oklahoma biomedical researchers while providing leadership in organizing computational resources in strategic planning to support basic and clinical research. This new, shared scientific resource will benefit not only the scientists at OMRF and throughout Oklahoma but ultimately, Oklahomans and people everywhere suffering from these conditions. 

The creation of this Center will require the renovation of an outdated and underutilized wing of OMRF. Currently consisting of outmoded and unusable laboratories, this space will be renovated to accommodate a state-of-the-art data analytics facility and all its accompanying technology. 

Project Name: Ambulances for Rural Hospital

Cost: $720,000
Recipient: Stilwell Memorial Hospital
Location: City of Stilwell
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
Support: "Memorial Hospital is deeply grateful to Senator Inhofe for his efforts to request funding for additional ambulances, a critical need,” said Daniel Bradley, President and CEO of Stillwell Memorial Hospital. “The Senator's efforts and leadership will ensure that Stilwell, as well as the surrounding area, has the equipment and emergency vehicles necessary to help save more lives, improve greater access to emergency care, and reduce overall health care costs for our community.”  

Stilwell Memorial Hospital will use funding to purchase two fully equipped ambulances. 

Stilwell Memorial Hospital in Stilwell, Okla., is a rural non-profit 501c3 community hospital in urgent need of two fully equipped ambulances in order for it to serve Adair County, including the communities of Stilwell and Westville. Currently, Stilwell Memorial must rely on other hospitals to respond to emergencies and/or transport patients to their emergency room, which is inefficient and costly for not only for the hospital, but also for patients. Further, the COVID-19 pandemic revealed difficulties with Stilwell Memorial Hospital’s capacity and ability to navigate emergency and EMS COVID response and recovery to its regional health service area. 
 
Stilwell and Adair County residents should not have to worry about access to emergency vehicles. A federal investment would provide Stilwell Memorial with two equipped ambulances, and with the generous assistance of private individuals and foundations, a third would be provided—thereby freeing the hospital from the burden of relying on other hospitals or from contracting with costly external organizations. With the procurement of three ambulances, Stilwell Memorial will be able to save more lives, improve access to emergency care and reduce health care costs.

Project Name: Maternal Health Center
Cost: $1,000,000
Recipient: Mercy Hospital Oklahoma City
Location: Oklahoma City
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
Praise for Sen. Inhofe's work: 

"Senator Inhofe has spent his entire life working to improve the quality of life of Oklahomans,” said Former First Lady and Governor of Oklahoma Cathy and Frank Keating. “The Love Family Women’s Center will not only focus on improving the quality of life for women across the state, it will also be able to escalate services to uninsured and Medicaid pregnant women and their children, from prenatal to end of life.  This will be the only facility of its kind in the state and no doubt something Senator Inhofe will be proud to have supported."

“Thank you Senator Inhofe for your actions in support of the Love Family Women’s Center at Mercy Hospital in Oklahoma City,” said Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby.

“In my 39 year career in healthcare leadership, I have not experienced growth of critical services to the degree we have experienced at Mercy over the past decade,” said President of Mercy Oklahoma Communities Jim Gebhart. “This creates a critical need for additional space. The Love Family Women’s Center will answer this critical need.  This is a once-in-a-lifetime project which will impact women and families for generations to come by providing access to the critical care for all women and infants—with particular concern for the economically disadvantaged.  This new women’s center will provide innovative, comprehensive care for women of all ages and stages of life and we believe will establish a new model of care to improve the mortality and morbidity statistics of pregnant women across the state.  We are proud to continue the legacy established by the Sisters of Mercy founded nearly 200 years ago and are grateful to Senator Inhofe for his continued support on behalf of women and families in Oklahoma.”       

“I am grateful to Senator Jim Inhofe for his support of quality healthcare throughout his long and distinguished public service career and his support of the Love Family Women’s Center at Mercy Hospital will help provide extraordinary healthcare access to women of all ages,” said Former Oklahoma Attorney General Michael C. Turpen.

“My husband Tom and I are very much behind the Love Family women’s Center,” said Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores Founder Judy Love. “In fact, so much so, our family has agreed to a $10 million donation.   We know of the incredible leadership Senator Inhofe has had over many years.  We sincerely appreciate any support you are able to give us in this incredible endeavor.”

"The Love Family Women’s Center at Mercy Hospital is a needed resource for the future well-being of Oklahoma families from every walk of life,” said 1967 Miss America Jane Jayroe Gamble. “We appreciate Senator Inhofe’s leadership and compassion for such worthwhile projects.”
 
Mercy Hospital in Oklahoma City will use this funding to assist in the construction of a new Women’s Center to serve obstetric patients and newborn babies.

Improving access to comprehensive and innovative health care for all women is critical. In Oklahoma City and surrounding communities, the need for high-quality Women’s and Children’s services outweighs the available options for care. After many years of continuous growth, Mercy Hospital Oklahoma City’s capacity to serve obstetric patients has plateaued due to the hard-limit of physical space in which care can be provided. 

Mercy Hospital Oklahoma City has been named one of the Best Maternity Hospitals 2021 by Newsweek and The Leapfrog Group. Just 217 hospitals in the country are included on the list. Unfortunately, until this project is complete, expectant mothers are often rescheduled for preplanned deliveries with frequent delays due to lack of available patient rooms. A major leap forward is needed both in physical space and in the quality of the healing environment demanded by a population that has enjoyed decades of steady growth, as the population of Oklahoma City has increased over 25 percent since 2000 and the hospital has seen a 36 percent increase in deliveries over the past decade. 

In addition to serving women in the Oklahoma City metro area, the new center will expand access for women living in the surrounding rural communities, where quality care is harder to come by, as well as economically disadvantaged women, as approximately 30 percent of women’s admissions and 50 percent of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit admissions consist of Medicaid or uninsured patients. Mercy anticipates serving 10,938 women and babies each year through the new center, increasing annual deliveries by nearly 50 percent. 

Mercy Women’s Center will offer comprehensive and integrated women’s health services from obstetrics and women’s wellness programs to the full spectrum of services related to labor and delivery. Families will also benefit from multiple groups of diverse providers. 

The $1 million congressional appropriation funding will be applied towards the construction costs needed for the center, including a NICU dedicated elevator system. 

Project Name: Construction and Equipment for Nursing Program
Cost: $ 866,000
Recipient: Tulsa Community College (TCC)
Location: City of Tulsa
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
Support: “We are so grateful to Senator Inhofe for his support of the expansion of the Tulsa Community College nursing program,” said Tulsa Community College President Leigh Goodson. “The need for well trained, qualified nurses is great, and, if approved,  this extraordinary funding will provide more nurses to serve the people of northeast Oklahoma and reduce our state’s shortage of healthcare workers.”

Construction and equipment funding would be used to expand the Tulsa Community College Nursing Program to address Oklahoma’s nursing shortage. 

The Tulsa Community College nursing program currently enrolls 352 students. Over the last five years, the demand for qualified nurses in the Tulsa area has increased, and expansion of the program will help meet the needs of the local health care providers and hospitals. The goal of this project is to incrementally increase enrollment each year over the next four years. In order to achieve this goal, TCC will add simulation mannequins and purchase additional lab equipment. These foundational components will allow the nursing program to enroll 70 additional students and increase the graduation rate to add an additional 50 graduates per year, increasing retention by utilizing the Nursing Success Specialist. Additional graduates will place more nurses in the health care system, thereby increasing access to health care for the surrounding community. 

Project Name: Behavioral Health Facilities at the Oklahoma Children’s Hospital

Cost: $1,000,000
Recipient: Oklahoma Children's Hospital
Location: Oklahoma City
State: Oklahoma
Certification: Link here
 
Support: “With the creation of an inpatient behavioral health unit, Oklahoma Children’s Hospital OU Health will meet the needs of Oklahoma’s children by providing compassionate, specialized care,” said President of Oklahoma Children’s Hospital OU Health Jon Hayes. “We are grateful to Sen. Inhofe for helping provide funding for modifications to our emergency department to enhance our ability to provide a safe space for pediatric patients. His support of this project will improve the health and well-being of Oklahoma’s children and families.”
 
Oklahoma Children’s Hospital will use funding to renovate and equip existing inpatient and emergency department rooms to more appropriately accommodate children entering the hospital’s behavioral health inpatient facility. 

Prior to the pandemic, our nation’s children and youth were experiencing a sharp increase in mental, emotional and behavioral health conditions—COVID-19 has introduced additional and dramatic stress for children and families. Children’s hospitals and community resources are struggling to keep pace with children’s mental health needs, as our nation and the state of Oklahoma run a severe shortage of inpatient care and treatment for children who need urgent attention. 

As Oklahoma’s only comprehensive, free-standing children’s hospital, Oklahoma Children’s Hospital is at the front lines of dealing with the majority of pediatric behavioral health issues in the state. Due to strict regulatory guidelines and limited space, pediatric patients with behavioral health needs often go untreated or under treated. Oklahoma Children’s Hospital and the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine are uniquely prepared to serve this population because of their specialized care teams which include psychiatry, psychology, nursing, childlife specialists, social workers and therapists. 

Modifications to existing inpatient and emergency department rooms will provide a safer environment for patients during their acute medical stay and/or while receiving emergency medical care as they wait for placement in the hospital’s inpatient behavioral health setting. These modifications will help ensure the hospital’s facilities are appropriately outfitted to care for these children, thereby creating a safer environment for patients and staff—critical components in healing and the advancement of care. 

This project also has the support of the Oklahoma Legislature and Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt. In the 2021 legislative session, the Oklahoma state legislature and Governor Stitt made an unprecedented investment in pediatric behavioral health and appropriated $9.9 million to an inpatient unit at the Oklahoma Children’s Hospital with the commitment to appropriate $27.9 million over the next three years to the project. The combined federal and state investment allows Oklahoma Children’s Hospital to address the inpatient and residential needs of this vulnerable and underserved population.